Closing the Employability Gap: Predictive Psychology as a Bridge to the Future

In a world of constant evolution, the gap between the skills that students acquire in higher education and those demanded by the labor market has become a chasm that threatens to engulf the aspirations of millions of young people.

This discordance not only poses a challenge for educational institutions and students but also reflects an urgent call to action for society as a whole. Its impact on the economy, social development, and the climate of coexistence is alarming, especially when considering the technological and automation revolution currently underway in the world of work.

A couple of weeks ago, I was in conversation with executives from a university with a presence across much of Europe, and the panorama is not at all different from the concerns seen in Latin America.

Students have significant gaps in their competencies, greatly impacting their employability. We speak of students because we still have them in our sight in classrooms, but in the world of work, something similar occurs, making the size of the gap truly enormous.

The Reality of the Employability Gap

Several global studies have highlighted the magnitude of this challenge. For example, a study by Korn Ferry (2022) indicates that 85% of business leaders predict that, in the future, soft skills will surpass technical skills in importance. Similarly, the McKinsey Global Institute projects a significant increase in demand for cognitive and socio-emotional skills. The World Economic Forum, on its part, identifies competencies such as critical thinking and creativity among the most demanded by 2025.

The direct consequence of this gap translates into youth unemployment, underemployment, and a notable loss of productivity. The global youth unemployment rate, according to the ILO, reached an alarming 13.6% in 2023, leaving millions of young people in precarious situations, with little or no access to job opportunities that align with their skills and studies. We must remember that these numbers do not consider NEETs, those young people who are not in education, employment, or training, whose numbers have also grown significantly over the last decade.

The Key May Lie in the Minds of These Young People


In light of this landscape, predictive psychology emerges as a high-impact possibility, as it allows us to find a new approach with good results and a high level of statistical reliability, which we can use to make crucial decisions in this field.

This discipline, which combines the development of psychometric models with machine learning, seeks to deeply understand each individual in order to design personalized interventions that enhance their competencies. Through simple assessments, yet with powerful interpretative analytics, both strengths and areas for improvement in key competencies such as critical thinking and communication can be identified. This enables the design of tailored training programs that prepare students not only to enter the job market but also to excel in it.

Furthermore, predictive psychology offers tailored career guidance, helping students choose careers that not only match their skills and interests but also align with market demands and their own potential for future performance. This not only improves employability rates but also increases job satisfaction, contributing to a more dynamic and resilient economy.

The Urgency to Act Now

The implementation of predictive psychology in the educational system is not a luxury but an urgent necessity. It requires a collaborative effort between universities, governments, and businesses to develop programs that integrate this discipline into the educational curriculum. Only in this way can we ensure that today’s youth are equipped with the necessary tools to face the challenges of tomorrow.

The employability gap is a complex problem that requires innovative and proactive solutions. Predictive psychology emerges as one of these solutions, offering a unique approach that goes beyond mere acquisition of technical knowledge. It involves understanding each individual at a deeper level, facilitating the development of competencies that are not only valuable today but also remain relevant in the future.

This is not something for the future; in fact, there are already universities utilizing these developments in predictive psychology. In a world of constant evolution, the gap between the skills students acquire in higher education and those demanded by the job market has become a chasm that threatens to swallow the aspirations of millions of young people.

This discordance not only poses a challenge for educational institutions and students but also reflects an urgent call to action for society as a whole. Its impact on the economy, social development, and the climate of coexistence is alarming, especially when considering the technological revolution and automation currently underway in the world of work.

Just a couple of weeks ago, I was speaking with executives from a university with a presence across much of Europe, and the panorama is not at all different from the concerns seen in Latin America. Students have significant gaps in their competencies, and this heavily impacts their employability. We’re focusing on students because we still see them in the classrooms, but something similar is happening in the world of work, making the size of the gap truly enormous.

The Reality of the Employability Gap

Various global studies have highlighted the magnitude of this challenge. For instance, a study by Korn Ferry (2022) indicates that 85% of business leaders foresee soft skills outweighing technical skills in importance in the future. Similarly, the McKinsey Global Institute projects a significant increase in demand for cognitive and socio-emotional skills. The World Economic Forum identifies competencies such as critical thinking and creativity among the most sought after by 2025.

The direct consequence of this gap translates into youth unemployment, underemployment, and a notable loss of productivity. According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), the global youth unemployment rate reached an alarming 13.6% in 2023, leaving millions of young people in precarious situations with little or no access to job opportunities aligned with their skills and studies. It’s worth noting that these figures do not account for NEETs (youth not in education, employment, or training), a demographic that has also increased significantly over the last decade.

The Key May Lie in the Minds of These Young People

Given this landscape, predictive psychology emerges as a high-impact possibility, allowing us to adopt a new approach with promising results and a high degree of statistical reliability, which we can use to make crucial decisions in this field.

This discipline, which combines the development of psychometric models with machine learning, aims to deeply understand each individual in order to design personalized interventions that enhance their competencies. Through simple assessments, yet with powerful interpretative analytics, both strengths and areas for improvement in key competencies such as critical thinking and communication can be identified. This allows for the design of tailored training programs that prepare students not only to enter the job market but to excel in it.

Moreover, predictive psychology offers tailored career guidance, assisting students in choosing careers that not only match their skills and interests but also align with market demands and their own potential for future performance. This not only improves employability rates but also enhances job satisfaction, contributing to a more dynamic and resilient economy.


The Urgency to Act Now

The implementation of predictive psychology in the educational system is not a luxury but an urgent necessity. It requires a collaborative effort among universities, governments, and businesses to develop programs that integrate this discipline into the educational curriculum. Only in this way can we ensure that today’s youth are equipped with the necessary tools to face the challenges of tomorrow.

The employability gap is a complex problem that requires innovative and proactive solutions. Predictive psychology emerges as one of these solutions, offering a unique approach that goes beyond mere acquisition of technical knowledge. It involves understanding each individual at a deeper level, facilitating the development of competencies that are not only valuable today but also remain relevant in the future.

This is not something of the future; in fact, some universities have been utilizing predictive psychology developments since 2020, and pioneers in management and personnel management began incorporating initial prototypes as early as 2015. Today, more than 2 million profiles are conducted worldwide every year. However, this still represents a small number compared to the global challenge we face.

If you would like to learn more about this or how to implement it in your institution, I am soon publishing a book specifically on how to successfully implement it within higher education. I would be delighted to share with you the fundamentals of the model that is improving quality and opening new opportunities for new technicians and professionals.

Share this article:

Facebook
X
LinkedIn
Telegram
WhatsApp